Wednesday’s Poison Roundup

1a

John Sanders worked in the orange and grapefruit groves in Redlands, California, for more than 30 years. First as a ranch hand, then as a farm worker, he was responsible for keeping the weeds around the citrus trees in check. Roundup, the Monsanto weed killer, was his weapon of choice, and he sprayed it on the plants from a hand-held atomizer year-round.

Frank Tanner, who owned a landscaping business, is also a Californian and former Roundup user. Tanner relied on the herbicide starting in 1974, and between 2000 and 2006 sprayed between 50 and 70 gallons of it a year, sometimes from a backpack, other times from a 200-gallon drum that he rolled on a cart next to him.

The two men have other things in common, too: After being regularly exposed to Roundup, both developed non-Hodgkin lymphoma, a blood cancer that starts in the lymph cells. And, as of April, both are plaintiffs in a suit filed against Monsanto that marks a turning point in the pitched battle over the most widely used agricultural chemical in history.

Until recently, the fight over Roundup has mostly focused on its active ingredient, glyphosate. But mounting evidence, including one study published in February, shows it’s not only glyphosate that’s dangerous, but also chemicals listed as “inert ingredients” in some formulations of Roundup and other glyphosate-based weed killers. Though they have been in herbicides — and our environment — for decades, these chemicals have evaded scientific scrutiny and regulation in large part because the companies that make and use them have concealed their identity as trade secrets.

@ TI

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About Den

Always in search of interesting things to post. Armed with knowledge and dangerous with the ladies.
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8 Responses to Wednesday’s Poison Roundup

  1. Den says:

    More proof that Roundup is poisoning us all with trade secrets in addition to glyphosate.

    Assholes!

    Like

  2. David B. Benson says:

    Sunny.

    Like

    • David B. Benson says:

      Clouding. @ the Birch & Barley after 47 minutes. Having ahi tuna tacos and a Black Butte porter.

      Like

      • David B. Benson says:

        Back to Sloan via a detour along some of he South Fork Trail. Total time today: 76 minutes.

        Day 4: 99+76=175 minutes.

        Like

  3. Michele N. says:

    The photo explains everything.

    Like

  4. Den says:

    The end of flabby LLamas on DWF

    Like

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