Spooky Tuesday

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New Yorkers aren’t strangers to ghost roommates, whether they be literal dead spirits or Craigslist randos who pay rent but never seem to sleep in the apartment. Still, if you’d like to upgrade your number of haunted bedrooms from two to seven, Staten Island’s famed Kreischer Mansion is on the market, murdered mafioso ghosts and all. (We visited the place in 2015, and you can watch our tour here.)

Curbed notes that the 130-year-old home is listed for a cool $2 million. The mansion is considered one of the most haunted places in the city, thanks in part to its pretty bloody history. Balthalzar Kreischer, a Bavarian immigrant who ran a fire-brick manufacturing company, built the home in 1885, then died a year later. His sons, Edward and Charles Kreischer, subsequently feuded over their father’s company—so much so that Edward allegedly shot himself in the head in the house over an argument with his brother. Then, a second mansion Kreischer built for Charles burned down, with both Charles and his wife inside.

@ THE SPOOKY GOTHAMIST

About Den

Always in search of interesting things to post. Armed with knowledge and dangerous with the ladies.
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12 Responses to Spooky Tuesday

  1. Den says:

    Haunted houses are cool as long as you leave fear at home. Having witnessed many ‘unexplained phenomena’ myself I have come to the conclusion that life has varying levels of spiritual existence, of course it cannot be proven on paper but there are other ways of proving something, personal experience with many spirits over the years.

    This house has it own spirits, no two spirits are the same, like us.

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  2. Micki says:

    From The Economist….posting entire article because of pay wall…

    THE constitution of the Chinese Communist Party defines what it means to be a party member and lists the organisation’s core beliefs. On October 24th a new principle was added to it: “Xi Jinping Thought on Socialism with Chinese Characteristics for a New Era”—quite a mouthful. Xinhua, a government news agency, said the change was approved at the end of a weeklong party congress, an event that takes place every five years. Party leaders had been parroting the cumbersome phrase for several days since Mr Xi, who is the party’s general secretary as well as president, first mentioned it (albeit without his own name attached) on the opening day of the gathering. Bill Bishop, an American China-watcher, says he writes it as XJPTSCCNE “to avoid getting carpal tunnel syndrome”.

    Talk of theory and whether someone is named in a document might sound recondite. But this has huge implications because it invests Mr Xi with more power than any Chinese leader since Mao Zedong. He is the first living leader to be mentioned in the party’s charter since Mao. Deng Xiaoping’s name is also in the constitution but this was an honour accorded him only after he died in 1997. Mr Xi’s two predecessors, Hu Jintao and Jiang Zemin, are not named. Moreover, Mr Xi’s thinking uses the same term in Chinese (sixiang) as the one in Mao Zedong Thought. Deng in contrast contributed only a “theory” (lilun), a less elevated term. No one can have more ideological authority than Mr Xi. The person has become the party in a way China has not seen since Mao Zedong.

    Mr Xi has made influential enemies during his first five years as party chief, notably the allies and clients of the hundreds of influential officials he has had arrested for corruption. He has also complained repeatedly that officials lower down the bureaucracy are stymying his orders. This could change, because to oppose him now would be regarded more than ever as opposition to the party itself. In principle, it could make decision-making in China smoother. But it raises the risk that underlings will tell Mr Xi only what they think he wants to hear, and increase the chances of bad policymaking.

    It also makes the question of the succession moot. By precedent, the general secretary should serve two five-year terms. Mr Xi’s run out in 2022. Under the rules that used to govern Chinese politics, he would be expected to signal his choice of successor at a meeting of the Central Committee that is due to be held on October 25th. The candidate would normally be in the new Politburo Standing Committee, or inner sanctum of politics, that will be unveiled after the brief gathering. Rumours are rife that Wang Qishan, the chief graft-buster and close ally of Mr Xi, has been dropped from the Central Committee, and therefore will not be included in the new line-up. There had been speculation that Mr Xi might keep him in place, even though he has passed the normal retirement age of 68.

    It is not clear how much it matters now who is chosen to succeed Mr Xi, or whether he has anyone in mind. With his name in the constitution, he must be the ultimate arbiter of authority as long as he is alive, since he—along with Marx, Lenin, Mao and Deng—defines what it is to be a good Chinese Communist.

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  3. Carol ٩(-̮̮̃-̃)۶ says:

    I used to entertain the idea that there were ghosts, that there was a god, magic, etc. Now I believe in none of it. When you’re dead, you’re dead. I’ll let you know if Bob comes back and knocks a few books off the shelf. Jill asked him several weeks ago to do that, lol.

    He’s still hanging on, thank goodness. Mostly sleeping and when wakeful, mostly has his eyes closed. We can talk to him so it’s almost like he’s normal.

    I have the pool draining right now. I would pick the coldest day when it’s only 45°. After all those hot days. My fault. I needed to get pool shock, can’t get it from my pool guy so today I finally thought to google the problem to see if I can use Clorox, and yes I can but it’s half the strength of pool chlorine so I’ll just double up. Anyway, have it draining and next nice day when Pete is here he can take filter apart and clean it and put it in our little barn for the winter

    I’m done with having a pool after 37 years. Pete said he’ll take it off my hands.

    Michigan is supposed to get snow within the next 10 days. I’m sure that mean Up North, not down here near Lansing.

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  4. David B. Benson says:

    Just now cooling below 70 °F as the sun goes out of the sky.

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  5. David B. Benson says:

    A typical 13 minutes.

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    • David B. Benson says:

      Up to Kimbrough for the percussion concert. Chatted with Keadrin. Then home for a total of 28 minutes.

      Day 3: 141+28=169 minutes.

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  6. Den says:

    Hot World Series, weather wise, other wise, 1&1 in the 6th, game is stuck.

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  7. Den says:

    Not stuck now 3-1, 7th, Dodgers. Kershaw killin the Astros.

    2 more left….

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  8. Den says:

    Spotted in Beverly Hills:

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