Native Tongue Thursday

tlingit flag Luxury 18 best Native American & First Nations Flags images on Pinterest

Alaska has declared an emergency for Native American languages, aiming to promote and preserve all 20 recognized indigenous tongues in the state before they die out.

The order signed this week by the state governor, Bill Walker, directs the state education commissioner to work with partners to promote indigenous languages in public education, KTOO Public Media in Juneau reported.

It also directs the state to use traditional Alaska Native place names on public signs. The order instructs state commissioners to designate a tribal liaison tasked with producing a plan to boost collaboration with Alaska Native partners.

@ THE GUARDIAN

About Den

Always in search of interesting things to post. Armed with knowledge and dangerous with the ladies.
This entry was posted in Uncategorized. Bookmark the permalink.

26 Responses to Native Tongue Thursday

  1. Micki says:

    NOVEMBER is National Native American Heritage Month.

    Language preservation programs are about keeping hallowed cultural traditions alive.

    Language preservation is an indispensable rung on the ladder of achievement for Native American and First Nations’ youth.

    Like

    • David B. Benson says:

      Please do not misuse the word “native”. It simply means born in this place. All of us here are native Americans. I am a native of the state of Washington but not of Pullman.

      Use “indigenous” to describe the aboriginals of America. It is the correct word. Thank all of you for enhancing literacy.

      Like

  2. Micki says:

    From a New Yorker article:

    This is a common dynamic in fraternities, and it has been a persistent one in the Yale chapter of Kavanaugh’s fraternity, Delta Kappa Epsilon, or dke(pronounced “deek”). When Kavanaugh was a sophomore, the Yale Daily Newsran a photograph of dke pledges carrying a flag woven out of women’s underwear across campus (Kavanaugh did not appear in the picture); in 2011, dke received a five-year suspension after its pledges yelled “No means yes! Yes means anal!” in front of the Yale Women’s Center. The fraternity’s 2016–17 president was suspended after the school found that he had engaged in “penetration without consent.” (In a statement to the Yale Daily News, he denied “many of the claims made” in the complaint filed against him.) “Fraternities attract men who value other men more than women,” Nicholas Syrett writes in his history of white fraternities, “The Company He Keeps,” published in 2009. “The intimacy that develops within fraternal circles between men who care for each other necessitates a vigorous performance of heterosexuality in order to combat the appearance of homosexuality.”
    +++++++
    From a review of Syrett’s book:

    Tracing the full history of traditionally white college fraternities in America from their days in antebellum all-male schools to the sprawling modern-day college campus, Nicholas Syrett reveals how fraternity brothers have defined masculinity over the course of their 180-year history. Based on extensive research at twelve different schools and analyzing at least twenty national fraternities, The Company He Keeps explores many factors–such as class, religiosity, race, sexuality, athleticism, intelligence, and recklessness–that have contributed to particular versions of fraternal masculinity at different times. Syrett demonstrates the ways that fraternity brothers’ masculinity has had consequences for other students on campus as well, emphasizing the exclusion of different groups of classmates and the sexual exploitation of female college students.

    Like

  3. Den says:

    I am avoiding the hearing like the plague, I’ll catch the highlights later which they will no doubt prattle on about for days until the next major drama moment.

    Like

    • °¿º Carol says:

      I watched the entire 9 hours. It was worth every minute and I didn’t get a headache like I did during Wednesday’s press conference.

      Like

  4. Den says:

    A sidebar to todays’ events.

    I have been mystified as to the remarkable reduction in my arthritic symptoms until the light bulb went off in my head, Flouride. I have been drinking non-flouridated water and using Tom’s of Maine non-flouride toothpaste. The results have been studied extensively, mostly in other countries. Google “Floride and Arthritis” and you will see the dangers of consuming Flouride in water and toothpaste that it poses to the body long term.

    My personal recovery had me analyzing a possible answer to it, Flouride appears most likely the cause as I drank city water all my life and used toothpaste containing Flouride as long and only recently started using non-flouride toothpaste effectively breaking the link between Arthritis and Flouride.

    I suggest removing Flouride from you life also and see what happens after a few months.

    Like

  5. David B. Benson says:

    Once again 15 minutes to the Hillside Cafe where today there are only a few.

    Like

    • David B. Benson says:

      Up to the CUB for an errand, then home makes 42 minutes so far today. Beautiful out.

      Like

      • David B. Benson says:

        Took yesterday’s nap in 3 installments from 4:30 until now. Amazing connected dream sequence over all 3 installments. Don’t remember most dreams but this one I hope that I do.

        Like

    • David B. Benson says:

      I don’t like the term “American Indian” as locally there are many “Indian Americans “. Got it?

      I don’t like the term “Native American” because I am one and so are you. Some of the aboriginals interviewed recognized this.

      Anthropologists use “Amerindian” for one grouping of the indigenous peoples but that leaves out the Dene who are in the Athabaskan wave of aboriginal immigrants.

      “Indigenees” is descriptively correct although to be absolutely precise “American indigenees” may sometimes be necessary. I am sure that all those fine people interviewed would be quite happy with that group descriptor.

      Like

  6. jimhitchcock says:

    I belong to the Delaware Tribe of Indians. Old school.

    Like

    • Micki says:

      I belong to the Swampy Cree tribe of First Nations. Old school here, too….

      By coincidence (or serendipity?) our decades-long friend in Anchorage called this evening.

      Mel was recently diagnosed with Stage 3B lung cancer — he was in a mood to reminisce and rejoice. Mel is full Aleut.

      I asked him if he is offended to be called an Alaska Native or Native American — he said he ABSOLUTELY prefers to be identified as an Alaskan Native, but “please mention that I identify with the Aleut culture..it’s a white man’s ridiculous appropriation to tell us how WE want to be identified.”

      He then went on to say, all this blathering about indigenous v. native is distracting — we are Native Alaskans — not lower case Alaska natives — and we want our specific culture to be remembered, Iñupiat, Yupik, Aleut, Eyak, Tlingit, Haida, Tsimshian, and some Northern Athabaskan cultures.

      Like

  7. Den says:

    Just when you thought you had seen everything:

    Like

  8. °¿º Carol says:

    With the hysterical fit Kavanaugh threw, the memes have been flying, VERY entertaining several of them.

    Republicans behaved badly, of course. Sickening as always. Two days of this stuff.

    Like

Express your views below, politely please.

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s