Sex Sells Saturday

1a

In 1964, a San Francisco cable car rolled partway down a hill before it came to an abrupt stop, causing a passenger, Gloria Sykes, to bang her head against a pole. Six years later, Sykes sued the railway, claiming that the accident had caused her to develop an “insatiable and uncontrollable desire for promiscuous sex.” In other words, she had become a nymphomaniac.

The lawsuit is remembered to this day as one of the most bizarre cases in San Francisco’s history. Here we take a closer look at it.

@ THOUGHTCO.com

About Den

Always in search of interesting things to post. Armed with knowledge and dangerous with the ladies.
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14 Responses to Sex Sells Saturday

  1. Den says:

    I wonder how many men will be whacking their spouses on the head hoping for a miracle such as this. Stay tuned for the grim results.

    Like

    • Carol says:

      Dearborn Hts., one of the Detroit suburbs near where I grew up. Two sets of my aunts and uncles lived there, a cousin and her family lived there. My daughter-in-law came not from the Heights but next to it, from Dearborn.

      We moved, out here to Dansville, famous as the home of “The Burning Bed” and Francine Hughes.

      By the way, the Dansville guy that is the son of one of my son’s high school friends, he didn’t make it on American Idol. He got cut during “group rounds,” which means nothing to those of you who’ve never seen the show. He made it that far, which was good. He’s an RN so he’s educated and has a good job, he’ll be ok but he would have been better if he had made it further to get the chance to make big money.

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  2. David B. Benson says:

    Dripping again. 😦

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  3. David B. Benson says:

    Raining. Bedraggled lupine. Brave early tulips.

    Standard 13 minutes to the north door of the Hillside Cafe.

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  4. Micki says:

    …and how was your day?

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  5. Micki says:

    The comments are as interesting as Timothy Egan’s article, who is one of my favorite NYT writers. Recently met him in B’ham during our “Whatcom Reads” program….

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  6. Micki says:

    Yesterday was the 70th anniversary of a memorable earthquake in this neck of the woods.

    Deep earthquakes like in 1949, 1965 and 2001 typically occur every 20 to 50 years.

    Those quakes were triggered by the Juan de Fuca plate being pushed beneath the North American plate. Based on historical patterns, another is possible by 2030.

    Most likely to wreak havoc in the Pacific Northwest is a crustal earthquake, officials say.

    That’s because several big cities sit on top of or near shallow crustal faults like the Seattle Fault, which runs beneath CenturyLink Field, west to Bainbridge Island to Hood Canal and east past Issaquah roughly following Interstate 90.

    The Seattle Fault last let go about 1,100 years ago.

    There’s an 84 percent chance Western Washington is hit by a similar crustal earthquake within the next 50 years, Dixon said.

    The most powerful and dangerous is a subduction zone quake, which can range in magnitude from 8.0 to 9.0 and happen roughly 20 miles below the surface.

    Those can cause prolonged shaking, tsunamis and large aftershocks.

    A subduction zone quake hasn’t struck the Cascadia fault offshore the Pacific Northwest since January 1700. Scientists believe the quake was a 9.0, triggering a tsunami within minutes.

    “When we think about the potential for the big one, the highest probability is a quake like in 1949, 1965 and 2001,” Tobin said. “That’s the most activity we’re seeing seismically.”

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  7. Micki says:

    Checking back in…where is DEN?

    When Mr. Reliability doesn’t show up, I get nervous.

    But, I suppose it’s too soon to get nervous.

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  8. Den says:

    I’m here, was away from the computer for a couple days, I’ll post a Sunday post to keep the continuity going tho, uno momento.

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